Posts Tagged ‘photographers’

Sony E mount 85mm G master Block lens

Thursday, September 1st, 2016

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Lens Sony 85mm Block
Mount E mount
F 1.4
Min focus distance 80cm
Blades 11

 

Overall

Sony E mount 85mm G master Block lens gives great sharpness and Bokeh & capture great details. So it’s a great lens.

 

Advantage of Sony E mount lens

-          Native AF system.

-          Benefits from all of Sony’s features including Eye AF

-          Works perfect with Sony A7s II, Sony A7R II, A7R, A7s etc.

 

AF / MF switch

-          AF/MF switches

-          Programmable Fn button (defaults to Focus Hold).

One can set the button to activate Eye AF for natural and easy access to the setting during use.

 

Operations

-          Rubberized focus ring helps you operate the lens smoothly

-          Improved focus-by-wire system helps these lenses to have a more natural feel does not seem to ramp up or down in speed depending on how fast you turn it.

 

Aperture ring

-          The integration of a physical aperture ring, allows to be clicked or de-clicked with a switch which makes it a great option for video shooters, as well as photographers.

 

Physical details

-          The small ridge on the bottom of the lens ensures that the lens’s aperture and focus rings are not lying directly on any surface when the camera is laid down.

 

Some Cons

The lens is slower than other native options due to the use of an older, and louder, Linear SSM system to move the large elements precisely, which could be changed by using the Direct Drive SSM available in many current models.

 

Chromatic Aberration at F1.4

There is a noticeable amount of chromatic aberration on high-contrast edges at f/1.4 which could of course be easily corrected in post

 

Tips : It gets better as you stop down, peaking at about f/4-5.6, where it will optimize the performance. Vignetting is also very well controlled and flare is nonexistent.

 

Focus Ring

There are still no witness markings on the lens and no hard end stops which makes them less appealing for use with follow and remote focus units.

They would work well with smaller handheld gimbals rather than larger Steadicams and gimbals

 

Comparison between Sony A7R II & Canon 5DSR

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Key Features Comparison

Untitled-1Untitled-2

 

 

Sony Alpha A7R II Canon EOS 5DS R
Sensor 42.4mp BSI FF CMOS 50mp FF CMOS
Image stabilisation YES NO
ISO range 50-102400 50-12800
Video spec 4K video FullHD
Mic / Headphone socket(s) Mic and headphone Mic only
Wi-Fi / NFC Wi-Fi and NFC None
Battery life 340 700

On the whole Both the camera will mainly cater to the still photography market. The 5dsr scores due to wider choice of lensing and higher mega pixels for sharper pictures while the Sony A7RII scored when it comes to low light, Image stabilization & 4k

Tripods and tracks give great steady images but are they practical always?

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

 

Time : Setting a track trolley and tripod needs time and space.                                     

Cost : Once you give a miss to the tripod, track, trolley and jib, you
save lots of money due to savings on costs of attendants, technicians,
production vehicles, etc. Indirect savings include decreased conveyance,
stay and food of the manpower.

Nimble is faster : A smaller crew is always nimble. Fewer heads, fewer confusions, higher efficiency

Effect : Shooting handheld gives a new feel. When we see the Tv series ‘24’ or the Bourne Series, we get the fast paced feel. A lot of that is shot handheld.

Less Intrusions : Often Police & security guards don’t interfere when you shoot handheld.

More convenient in weddings, offices, travel shoots etc
While shooting weddings and city offices setting a tripod is not always possible. Tracks could damage the furniture or inconvenience the people around.

Shoot Professionally without a Track & a Tripod

Beware !
Shooting handheld can be tricky and can make the work look amateurish.

 

Depth of field in camera lenses – Simplified

Friday, April 29th, 2016

f-stop-depth-of-field

 

Depth of field is the zone of acceptable sharpness within a photo that will appear in focus. In every picture there is a certain area of your image in front of, and behind the subject that will appear in focus.

This zone will differ from photo to photo. Some images may have very small zones of focus which is called shallow depth of field.

Others may have a very large zone of focus which is called deep depth of field.

3 main factors that will affect how you control the depth of field of your images are:

aperture (f-stop),

distance from the subject to the camera, and

focal length of the lens on your camera.

Photography Image Size for good quality printing – Simplified

Thursday, April 28th, 2016

Most of the times the printers requests photos in dpi (dots per inch) whereas most cameras shoot in mega pixels. We have offered an easy calculation for calculating dpi from megapixels

Convert pixels to dpi Output to Monitors/Printers)

Formula: Pixels ÷ DPI = image size width X height (in inches)

Convert inches to Pixels (Input from Scanners)

Formula: width (in inches) X height (inches) X DPI = Pixels

For example of the image size required is 40 inches X 30 inches at 300 dpi than the megapixel on the camera required would be

40 X 30 X 300 = 360000 pixles (or 3.6 mega pixels)

details sourced from : http://auctionrepair.com/pixels.html